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Current Exhibitions

Jacob Hashimoto: This Particle of Dust

On view December 2022 through 2023

Jacob Hashimoto (American, b. 1973), Detail, "In the Heart of this Infinite Particle of Galactic Dust", 2019. Site specific installation at Willis Tower, Chicago, Illinois. Resin, bamboo, UV prints, and stainless steel. Dimensions variable. Image courtesy of the artist. Photographer: Ed Knigge.
Jacob Hashimoto (American, b. 1973), Detail, In the Heart of this Infinite Particle of Galactic Dust, 2019. Site specific installation at Willis Tower, Chicago, Illinois. Resin, bamboo, UV prints, and stainless steel. Dimensions variable. Image courtesy of the artist. Photographer: Ed Knigge.
Jacob Hashimoto (American, b. 1973), "In the Heart of this Infinite Particle of Galactic Dust", 2019. Site specific installation at Willis Tower, Chicago, Illinois. Resin, bamboo, UV prints, and stainless steel. Dimensions variable. Image courtesy of the artist. Photographer: Ed Knigge. 
Jacob Hashimoto (American, b. 1973), In the Heart of this Infinite Particle of Galactic Dust, 2019. Site specific installation at Willis Tower, Chicago, Illinois. Resin, bamboo, UV prints, and stainless steel. Dimensions variable. Image courtesy of the artist. Photographer: Ed Knigge. 

The artist takes inspiration from cloud formations and the cosmos, with each navy blue kite featuring star-like markings. Depending on the time of day and the natural light filtering through the atrium skylights, the kites will shift in color intensity. This Particle of Dust explores the visual poetics of light and dark, color and form, as well as space and architecture.

Created from over 2,500 handmade kites, This Particle of Dust is a site-specific installation and unique to the Tampa Museum of Art’s architecture. The installation represents Jacob Hashimoto’s exploration of abstract landscape and his interest in blurring the boundaries between painting and sculpture. This Particle of Dust evokes the experience of observing the night sky through various cloud clusters. Thousands of transparent and opaque white discs hang suspended from a bespoke armature. Navy blue kites, imprinted with white and cerulean blue star patterns, hang amidst the cloud shapes and catch the light as the sun rises over the Museum and dips into the horizon over the Hillsborough River. Depending on one’s vantage point, either from the lobby, stairwell, or galleries, the experience of This Particle of Dust shifts—from below the cloudscape appears to drift into the sky while at eye-level the viewer looks directly into the stars.  

Hashimoto began making kite sculptures twenty-years ago while an art student in Chicago. Inspired by traditional Chinese kite making in the city of Weifang, where the artform of sculptural dragon kites originated, Hashimoto has made hundreds of thousands of kites from Japanese paper and resin. He appreciates kites as a universal object of joy that is recognized across the globe. Transformed into monumental artworks, Hashimoto’s kites convey happiness, wonder, and serenity.