• Frank Stella: What You See

    On view April 2 through August 2, 2020

    In conjunction with Frank Stella: Illustrations after El Lissitzky’s Had Gadya, the Tampa Museum of Art is organizing Frank Stella: What You See, a pendant exhibition featuring works by Frank Stella in regional collections, including the Tampa Museum of Art’s permanent collection. The exhibition is inspired by Stella’s quote “What you see is what you see,” the artist’s famed description of his art as noted in a 1964 interview. The intimate selection of works will provide an overview of Stella’s oeuvre from his exploration of minimal forms in the 1960s and 1970s, to the creation of lyrical multi-media compositions in the late 1990s. Frank Stella: What You See will present a snapshot view of one of today’s most influential living artists.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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    Sinjerli Variation Squared with Colored Ground III, 1981

    Frank Stella (American, b. 1936), Lithograph and serigraph. 40 x 40 inches. Artist’s proof IX. Tampa Museum of Art, Museum Purchase, 1986.002. © 2020 Frank Stella / Artists rights Society (ARS), New York.

  • Frank Stella: Illustrations after
    El Lissitzky’s Had Gadya
    from the Collection of BNY Mellon

    On view April 2 through August 2, 2020

    Frank Stella (American, b. 1936) created the series Illustrations after El Lissitzky’s Had Gadya (1984) after seeing artist El Lissitzky’s artwork at the Tel Aviv Museum of Art. Between 1917 and 1919, Lissitzky (Russian, 1890-1941) completed imagery for a children’s book of “Had Gadya”, an allegorical song sung at the close of the Passover Seder. Lissitzky’s modernist interpretation of the traditional song highlighted the influence of the Russian avant-garde in his work, as he depicted characters and scenes in "Had Gadya" with abstract forms and interlocking geometric shapes. Inspired by Lissitzky’s "Had Gadya", Stella produced a suite of prints corresponding to the artist’s imagery. Rather than re-interpret the song, Stella responded to Lissitzky’s abstractions with his own signature vibrant palette and curvilinear gestures. The exhibition Frank Stella: Illustrations after El Lissitzky’s Had Gadya will feature Stella’s complete portfolio of twelve prints, each unique in technique and color.

     

     

     

     

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    Had Gadya: The Butcher Came and Slew the Ox, 1982-84

    Frank Stella (American, b. 1936), Mixed-media relief hand-painted in color. 56 7/8 x 55 3/8 inches. Collection of BNY Mellon. © 2020 Frank Stella / Artists rights Society (ARS), New York.

  • HerStory: Stories of Ancient Heroines and Everyday Women

    On view April 25, 2020 through March 28, 2021

    In celebration of the 100th anniversary of women’s suffrage, the Tampa Museum of Art presents a series of exhibitions focused on the achievements of women in the arts. HerStory: Stories of Ancient Heroines and Everyday Women explores the story of women in the ancient world through the depictions of goddesses, heroines, mythological characters, and everyday women in the Museum’s collection of classical antiquities. The exhibition highlights objects that speak to the role of women in the ancient world, their myths and stories, from Aphrodite and Athena to Amazon Warriors to women of the everyday. These roles will be examined through the museum’s collection of statues, fragments, vessels, and objects from daily life.

    Red-Figure Handleless Loutrophoros (Ritual Water Vessel)

    Attributed to the White Saccos Painter. South Italian, Apulian, ca. 330 BC. Ceramic. H: 41 inches. Tampa Museum of Art, Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. Sahlman, 1987.037. Photographer: Orestis Kourakis.

  • Sketches and Sculptures: A Study of C. Paul Jennewein

    On view May 16, 2020 through February 28, 2021

    Active throughout the early to mid-20th century, sculptor C. Paul Jennewein created works that ranged from intimate small-scale bronze sculptures to major architectural projects. His creations reveal the inspiration of the ancient world while also engaging with the new sculptural styles of his time, merging Art Deco with the neo-classical tradition. In 1978, the Tampa Bay Art Center, predecessor of the Tampa Museum of Art, received a bequest of 2,600 objects including finished artworks, as well as preparatory drawings, plaster casts, and molds. The exhibition Sketches and Sculptures: A Study of C. Paul Jennewein presents an overview of the artist’s prolific career and his archive at the Tampa Museum of Art.

    Repose, 1920

    C. Paul Jennewein (German-American, 1890-1978). Bronze. H. 10 inches. Tampa Museum of Art, Bequest of C. Paul Jennewein,1983.300.004.

  • SKYWAY: A Contemporary Collaboration 2020

    On view June 25 through October 25, 2020

    Skyway: A Contemporary Collaboration celebrates the artists and work created in the Tampa Bay area. Launched as a triennial exhibition in 2017, this survey show is the second presentation of Skyway and is mounted collaboratively by the Tampa Museum of Art, Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg, the John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art, and the Contemporary Art Museum at the University of South Florida. Skyway highlights the breadth of artistic practices in the counties served by the organizing museums: Hillsborough, Pinellas, Manatee, Sarasota, and new to the 2020 exhibition, Pasco. The exhibition will be on view simultaneously at the four museums starting in Summer 2020.

     

     

     

  • Living Color: The Art of the Highwaymen

    On View November 19, 2020 through March 28, 2021

    The Highwaymen are a group of African American artists celebrated for their distinctive paintings of Florida’s natural environment. Working in and around the Fort Pierce area beginning in the 1950s, these self-taught artists depicted the state’s scenic coastline and wild backcountry, often in dazzling combinations of color and tone. Brilliant tropical sunsets, windblown palms, towering sunlit clouds, and blooming royal poinciana trees are among the many subjects that have become iconic images of Florida, in part because of the paintings that the Highwaymen created.

     

    Living Color: The Art of the Highwaymen focuses on work produced from the 1950s to the 1980s by a core group of the Highwaymen including Al Black, Mary Ann Carroll, Willie Daniels, Johnny Daniels, James Gibson, Alfred Hair, Roy McLendon, Harold Newton, Sam Newton, Willie Reagan, and Livingston Roberts. The exhibition brings special attention on two key artists, Harold Newton and Alfred Hair, and presents extensive examples of their work. Drawn from five private collections, Living Color also considers the role of collectors in preserving the legacy of these artists and their extraordinary life stories.

     

    The exhibition is organized by the Orlando Museum of Art and curated by Gary Monroe in collaboration with
    OMA curator Hansen Mulford.

    Untitled (Backcountry with Mighty Oak Tree and Coconut Palm), n.d.

    Willie Daniels (American, b. 1950), Oil on Upson board. 22 ¾ x 34 ¾ inches. Courtesy of the Jacobs Collection. Photography by Tariq Gibran. © Willie B. Daniels

    Untitled (Pastoral scene with bulls), n.d.

    Alfred Hair (American, 1941-1970), Oil on Upson board. 30 ¾ x 34 ½ inches. Courtesy of the Jacobs Collection. Photography by Tariq Gibran. © Doretha Hair Truesdell

    Untitled (Royal Poinciana), n.d.

    Harold Newton (American, 1934-1991), Oil on Upson board. 23 ½ x 29 ¾ inches. Courtesy of the Asselstine Collection. Photography by Tariq Gibran. © Harold Newton