• Robert Rauschenberg: America Mix-16

    On view August 9, 2019 through January 5, 2020

    One of the 20th century’s most influential artists, Robert Rauschenberg (American, 1925-2008) defined his oeuvre by using ordinary, non-traditional materials to create distinct works of art. His “combines” hovered between painting and sculpture, and incorporated a range of media and techniques. Rauschenberg often used photography in his work and layered images to render provocative narratives or observations about the world around him. Suite 1 from (America Mix-16), 1983, a portfolio of 16 photogravures, features photographs of found vignettes or objects Rauschenberg encountered during his travels around the US. He found beauty in the mundane, such as a dilapidated rag hanging from the gas cap of an abandoned truck or the inadvertent still life of trashed objects resting on the curb. Rarely exhibited from the Tampa Museum of Art’s collection, the entirety of this portfolio will be on view.

  • Jean-Michel Basquiat: One Master Artist / One Masterpiece

    On view September 12, 2019 through January 26, 2020

    Jean-Michel Basquiat: One Master Artist / One Masterpiece focuses on Basquiat’s Untitled (Word on Wood), 1985, one of the artist’s unique wood slat paintings. The exhibition will present a close look and formal analysis of this painting, as well as examine the artist’s distinct visual vocabulary. Related materials and films will further contextualize the work. Jean-Michel Basquiat: One Master Artist / One Masterpiece offers visitors the opportunity to view one of Basquiat’s significant artworks in an intimate setting. This presentation of Untitled (Word on Wood) highlights how Basquiat’s short yet influential career heralded new directions in abstract figuration and 20th-century painting.

    The exhibition Jean-Michel Basquiat: One Master Artist / One Masterpiece is part of the exhibition series Ordinary/Extraordinary: Assemblage in Three Acts. The series simultaneously presents three discrete shows focused on works by Jean-Michel Basquiat, Purvis Young, and a selection of 20th- and 21st-century Haitian Vodou flags. The use of found objects, such as discarded wood and textiles, formally links the exhibitions together. More importantly, historical and socio-economic narratives informed by the Afro-Caribbean Diaspora, the Black experience in America, as well as European artistic influences, unite the artists featured in the series. Although each is a stand-alone show, viewed together, the series explores provocative portrayals of race, identity, spirituality, survival, and hope in a range of assemblage objects and compositions.

    This exhibition is supported in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts

  • Purvis Young

    On view September 12, 2019 through January 26, 2020

    The exhibition Purvis Young presents for the first time the depth of the Purvis Young (American, 1943-2010) collection in the Tampa Museum of Art’s holdings. In 2004, the Rubell Family Foundation gifted 91 works by Young to the Museum, one of the largest donations of the artist’s work in the Southeast. Young, a self-taught artist, created thousands of assemblages with imagery of protesters, pregnant women, and warriors on wood remnants, cabinets, and doors. This exhibition explores the artist’s distinct iconography and reflects on Young’s experiences living and working in Overtown, Miami.

    Purvis Young is part of the exhibition series Ordinary/Extraordinary: Assemblage in Three Acts. The series simultaneously presents three discrete shows focused on works by Jean-Michel Basquiat, Purvis Young, and a selection of 20th- and 21st-century Haitian Vodou flags. The use of found objects, such as discarded wood and textiles, formally links the exhibitions together. More importantly, historical and socio-economic narratives informed by the Afro-Caribbean Diaspora, the Black experience in America, as well as European artistic influences, unite the artists featured in the series. Although each is a stand-alone show, viewed together, the series explores provocative portrayals of race, identity, spirituality, survival, and hope in a range of assemblage objects and compositions.

    Untitled, ca. 1985-1999

    Purvis Young (American, 1943-2010). Mixed media. Tampa Museum of Art, Gift of the Rubell Family Collection, Miami, FL, 2004.046.025. © Larry T. Clemons / Gallery 712 / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York). Purvis Young often painted on discarded wood doors. The imagery depicts angels looking over the artist’s community.

    Untitled, ca. 1985-1999

    Purvis Young (American, 1943-2010). Mixed media. 38 1/2 x 18 3/8 inches. Tampa Museum of Art, Gift of the Rubell Family Collection, Miami, FL, 2004.046.016. © Larry T. Clemons / Gallery 712 / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York). This work depicts Purvis Young’s portrayal of shackled men.

    Untitled, ca. 1985-1999

    Purvis Young (American, 1943-2010). Mixed media. Tampa Museum of Art, Gift of the Rubell Family Collection, Miami, FL, 2004.046.085. © Larry T. Clemons / Gallery 712 / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York). Purvis Young often painted on discarded wood doors. The imagery depicts angels looking over the artist’s community.

    Untitled, ca. 1985-1999

    Purvis Young (American, 1943-2010). Mixed media. 64 5/8 x 47 1/4 inches. Tampa Museum of Art, Gift of the Rubell Family Collection, Miami, FL, 2004.046.064. © Larry T. Clemons / Gallery 712 / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York). Pregnant women reappear throughout the artist’s work as symbols of hope for the new generation.

    This exhibition is supported in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts

  • Sacred Diagrams: Haitian Vodou Flags from the Gessen Collection

    On view September 12, 2019 through January 26, 2020

    Sacred Diagrams: Haitian Vodou Flags from the Gessen Collection examines the tradition and artistry of Haitian Vodou flags. Often made of discarded burlap bags, repurposed fabric, beads, and sequins, Vodou flags represent Haiti’s spiritually rich yet often misunderstood Vodou religion. Guest curator and artist Edouard Duval-Carrié (Haitian, b. 1954) examines the role of Vodou flags and flagmakers within Haiti’s dynamic visual culture.  Sacred Diagrams highlights vintage ceremonial flags from the 1950s and 1960s, as well as explores recent interpretations of Vodou flags by artists Clotaire Bazile, Myrlande Constant, Mireille Delice Delisme, Silva Joseph, Dubreus Lherisson, Edgar Jean Louis, Antoine Oleyant, Yves Telemaque, and George Valris.

    This exhibition is part the exhibition series Ordinary/Extraordinary: Assemblage in Three Acts. The series simultaneously presents three discrete shows focused on works by Jean-Michel Basquiat, Purvis Young, and a selection of 20th- and 21st-century Haitian Vodou flags. The use of found objects, such as discarded wood and textiles, formally links the exhibitions together. More importantly, historical and socio-economic narratives informed by the Afro-Caribbean Diaspora, the Black experience in America, as well as European artistic influences, unite the artists featured in the series. Although each is a stand-alone show, viewed together, the series explores provocative portrayals of race, identity, spirituality, survival, and hope in a range of assemblage objects and compositions.

    Ague Taroyo, 2007

    Myrlande Constant (Haitian, b. 1968). Mixed media. 48 x 42 inches. Collection of Ed and Ann Gessen; Photographer: Philip LaDeau.

    Le Sirene and Ague, 2005

    Lionel St. Eloi (Haitian, b. 1950), Mixed media. 33 x 32 inches. Collection of Ed and Ann Gessen; Photographer; Philip LaDeau.

    St. Jacques Majeur, ca. 1950-1970's

    Artist unknown. Mixed media. 33 x 31 inches. Collection of Ed and Ann Gessen; Photographer; Philip LaDeau.

    Dambalah, ca. 1950

    Artist unknown. Mixed media. 25 x 29 inches. Collection of Ed and Ann Gessen; Photographer: Philip LaDeau.

    Grand Erzulie, 2012

    Myrlande Constant (Haitian, b. 1968). Mixed media. 14 x 17 inches. Collection of Ed and Ann Gessen; Photographer; Philip LaDeau.

    Ogou Ferrialle, 2004

    Myrlande Constant (Haitian, b. 1968). Mixed media. 42 x 48 inches. Collection of Ed and Ann Gessen; Photographer; Philip LaDeau.

    This exhibition is supported in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts

  • Making of a Museum: 100 Years / 100 Works

    On view November 14, 2019 through March 15, 2020

    On the eve of the Tampa Museum of Art’s 100th anniversary in 2020, the exhibition Making of a Museum: 100 Years / 100 Works from the Permanent Collection, will feature works representative of the institution’s collecting history and mission. The collection is unique—with significant holdings of ancient Greek and Roman art, as well as increased acquisitions of modern and contemporary art. With eight main categories, the collection features a breadth of objects: Classical Antiquities, Prints and Photographs Related to Classical Antiquity, the C. Paul Jennewein Archive, Painting, Decorative Arts and Sculpture, Photography, Works on Paper, and New Media, Video, and Installation Art.

    Making of a Museum: 100 Years / 100 Works will present unique insight into how the collection and identity of the Museum has evolved as it has grown from a small local arts organization to the City’s preeminent museum of art.

    Zito's Bakery, 1932, from the portfolio Retrospective

    Berenice Abbott (American, 1898-1991). Published by Parasol Press, 1982. Gelatin silver print. 23 x 18 ¼ inches. Tampa Museum of Art, Gift of Mr. Morton D. Brozinsky, given in memory of Joseph Brozinsky, 1991.031.003

    Ship-Building, Gloucester Harbor from Harper's Weekly, October 11, 1873

    Winslow Homer (American, 1836-1910). Lithograph. 9 1/4 x 13 3/4 inches. Tampa Museum of Art, Gift of Henry Feiwel, 1997.012.006.

    Raft, 2017

    Mernet Larsen (American, b. 1940). Acrylic and mixed media on canvas. 66 1/4 x 52 3/4 in. Tampa Museum of Art, Museum Purchase with funds contributed by Tampa Collects as well as Liz Dimmitt & Piers Davies, Vevie & Lawrence Dimmitt, Mary B. Perry, John Tarapani, Dr. Robert & Sue Isbell, Sandy & Penny Liu, Rick Simonetti, Stanton Storer, Debra Williams, and Susan Mueller, 2018.001

    Lion Couchant

    Greek, Archaic, ca. 6th century BC. Limestone; L. 17 inches (44 cm).

    Red-Figure Hydria (Water Jar), (detail)

    Attributed to the Harrow Painter, Greek, Attic, ca. 470 BC. Ceramic; H. 18 inches (46 cm). Tampa Museum of Art, Joseph Veach Noble Collection, purchased in part with funds donated by Mr. and Mrs. James L. Ferman, Jr., 1986.070.

  • White Gold: Thomas Sayre

    On view January 23 through May 17, 2020

    White Gold is an immersive installation by artist Thomas Sayre (American, b. 1950) and depicts a cotton-filled Southern landscape. The work intends to express the beauty, the complexity, and the tragedy of our embroiled agricultural traditions. Cotton is one of the nation’s most contentious and layered materials, and one with which almost every American has a personal relationship, either directly or indirectly. Inevitably, it is linked to the economic, racial, and social history of the region and its people. Sayre’s White Gold refers to cotton and a reverence for the land, the labor, and the people (forced or unforced) who made cotton their livelihood. The installation is a fierce expression of the Southern landscape: its magnificence and the haunting pain of history, memory, and ultimately, belonging.

     

    White Gold: Thomas Sayre is organized by the Mississippi Museum of Art and the Contemporary Art Museum of Raleigh.

     

    White Gold, 2016-17

    Thomas Sayre (American, b. 1950), Mixed media. Installation view. © 2017 Thomas Sayre / Clearscapes

  • Modern Women: Modern Vision, Works from the Bank of America Collection

    On view February 20 through May 24, 2020

    Since photography’s inception in the mid-nineteenth century, women have stood among its artistic and technological pioneers. Modern Women : Modern Vision features 100 works from the Bank of America Collection by leading artists of the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. The exhibition is organized in six thematic sections: Modernist Innovators, Documentary Photography and the New Deal, Photo League, Modern Masters, Exploring the Environment, and The Global Contemporary Lens. Each section examines the photographers’ role in forging new directions and methods in photography, as well as how the medium has evolved with the advent of new digital and studio practices.  Artists featured in this exhibition include Berenice Abbott, Diane Arbus, Tina Barney, Bernd Becher and Hilla Becher, Margaret Bourke-White, Esther Bubley, Imogen Cunningham, Rineke Dijkstra, Candida Höfer, Barbara Kruger, Dorothea Lange, Nikki S. Lee, Helen Levitt, Sonia Handelman Meyer, DoDo Jin Ming, Ruth Orkin, Cindy Sherman, Carrie Mae Weems, and others.

     

     

    Presented By

     

     

    This Exhibition has been loaned through the
    Bank of America
    Art in our Communities program.

    Father & Sons, 1996

    Tina Barney (American, b. 1945), Negative 1996, printed 2006. Color coupler print. 48 x 60 inches. Bank of America Collection. © Tina Barney. Image courtesy Kasmin Gallery.