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Past Exhibitions

Dawoud Bey & Carrie Mae Weems: In Dialogue

On View July 21 – October 23, 2022

Dawoud Bey (American, b. 1953). The Woman in the Light, Harlem, NY, 1980. Gelatin silver print, 20 x 24 inches. © Dawoud Bey. Courtesy of Stephen Daiter Gallery.
Carrie Mae Weems (American, b. 1953). Harlem Street, 1976–77. Gelatin silver print, 5 5/16 x 8 15/16 inches. © Carrie Mae Weems. Courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York.

Dawoud Bey & Carrie Mae Weems: In Dialogue is organized by the Grand Rapids Art Museum, with presenting support generously provided by MillerKnoll. Additional support is provided by Wege Foundation, Agnes Gund, the National Endowment for the Arts, and Eenhoorn, LLC.

Dawoud Bey & Carrie Mae Weems: In Dialogue brings together a focused selection of work from a period of over forty years by two of today’s most important and influential photo-based artists.

Dawoud Bey and Carrie Mae Weems, both born in 1953, came of age during a period of dramatic change in the American social landscape. Since meeting at the Studio Museum in Harlem in 1976, the two artists have been intellectual colleagues and companions. Over the following five decades, Bey and Weems have explored and addressed similar themes: race, class, representation, and systems of power, creating work that is grounded in specific African American events and realities while simultaneously speaking to a multitude of human conditions. This exhibition, for the first time, brings their work together to shed light on their unique trajectories and modes of presentation, and their shared consciousness and principles.

From the outset of their careers, both Bey and Weems have operated from a deep social commitment to participate in, describe, and define culture. In seeking to express themselves fully, both artists have expanded possibilities within photography and video to address their chosen subjects. Each engaged in the material and conceptual developments in the art world that were gaining prominence beginning in the 1970s, just as their careers were developing. As Bey and Weems have continued to push their own work forward, their art and approach have inspired notable younger artists such as LaToya Ruby Frazier, Lyle Ashton Harris, Mickalene Thomas, and Hank Willis Thomas.

Both Bey and Weems create work in focused series that gives them the opportunity to fully explore their complex and layered ideas. Dawoud Bey & Carrie Mae Weems: In Dialogue is arranged in five sections that present the two artists’ work in thematic pairings, emphasizing both their mutual concerns and distinct artistic approaches.

This exhibition pairs the two artists’ work in five sections that emphasize both their distinct artistic approaches and their shared interests and concerns: Early Work, Broadening the Scope, Resurrecting Black Histories, Memorial and Requiem, and Revelations in the Landscape. Also featured in the exhibition are videos by Bey and Weems that show their approaches to the moving photographic image as an extension of their still photographic series.

Beginning with Early Work, viewers will travel through the 35mm photography Bey and Weems captured at the outset of their careers, embracing both spontaneous scenes of city life, and more quiet, domestic interactions. In Broadening the Scope, Bey and Weems begin staging their photographs — Bey capturing posed street portraits of young subjects in urban environments and Weems staging her groundbreaking, narrative-based Kitchen Table Series.

In Resurrecting Black Histories, we see the artists’ deepened interest in documenting places and moments heavy with historical importance. Bey captures safe houses and meeting sites in near darkness along the Underground Railroad of Ohio, while Weems’ somber Sea Island Series explores the African legends and folklore that was retained within the Gullah culture of the Southern United States. In Memorial and Requiem, both artists become full-fledged in their commitment to cultural documentation, paying homage to tragic historic events. In the final section, Revelations in the Landscape, the artists return to a more distanced observation, contemplating the effects of time through location. Bey revisits Harlem, now photographing the effects of gentrification in color, while Weems appears in her own shots against the ancient structures of Rome, clad all in black as she guides the viewer through age-old institutional powers abroad.

Presenting Sponsor

Bank of America

Artworks

Dawoud Bey (American, b. 1953). Self and Shadow, New York, NY, 1980. Gelatin silver print, 20 x 24 inches. © Dawoud Bey. Courtesy of Stephen Daiter Gallery.
Dawoud Bey (American, b. 1953). Taneesha, 1999. Internal dye diffusion transfer prints, 30 x 22 inches each (30 x 66 inches overall). © Dawoud Bey. Courtesy of Stephen Daiter Gallery.
Carrie Mae Weems (American, b. 1953). Reclining Girl, Fiji, 1982–83. Gelatin silver print, 5 5/16 x 8 15/16 inches. © Carrie Mae Weems. Courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York.
Carrie Mae Weems (American, b. 1953) The Edge of Time–Ancient Rome, from the series Roaming, 2006. Digital chromogenic print, 73 x 61 inches. © Carrie Mae Weems. Courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York.
Carrie Mae Weems (American, b. 1953). First Self Portrait, 1975. Gelatin silver print, 8 5/8 x 8 5/8 inches. © Carrie Mae Weems. Courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York.
Carrie Mae Weems (American, b. 1953). Untitled (Woman and Daughter with Children) from The Kitchen Table Series, 1990. Gelatin silver print, 27 ¼ x 27 1/4. © Carrie Mae Weems. Courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York.
Dawoud Bey (American, b. 1953). The Birmingham Project: Taylor Falls and Deborah Hackworth, 2012. Archival pigment prints mounted to dibond, 40 x 64 inches (two separate 40 x 32 inch photographs). © Dawoud Bey. Courtesy of Stephen Daiter Gallery.
Dawoud Bey (American, b. 1953). Former Renaissance Ballroom Site, Harlem, NY, from the series Harlem Redux, 2016. Archival pigment print, 40 x 48 inches. © Dawoud Bey. Courtesy of Stephen Daiter Gallery.
Dawoud Bey (American, b. 1953). Couple in Prospect Park, 1990 (printed 2018). Gelatin silver print, 21 7/8 x 17 1/2 inches. Grand Rapids Art Museum, Museum Purchase, 2018.22. © Dawoud Bey. Courtesy of Stephen Daiter Gallery.
Carrie Mae Weems (American, b. 1953). Untitled (Woman playing solitaire) from The Kitchen Table Series, 1990. Gelatin silver print, 40 x 40 inches. © Carrie Mae Weems. Courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York.
Dawoud Bey (American, b. 1953). The Birmingham Project: Wallace Simmons and Eric Allums, 2012. Archival pigment prints mounted to dibond, 40 x 64 inches (two separate 40 x 32 inch photographs). © Dawoud Bey. Courtesy of Stephen Daiter Gallery.

Exhibition Catalogue

Accompanying the exhibition is an illustrated catalogue published with DelMonico Books and distributed by D.A.P. (Distributed Art Publishers, Inc.) which documents Bey and Weems’ photographs and includes scholarly essays by GRAM Chief Curator Ron Platt and National Museum of African American History & Culture Deputy Director, Kinshasa Holman Conwill, along with written reflections by both artists.

About Dawoud Bey

Portrait of Dawoud Bey by Whitten Sabbatini

Photographer Dawoud Bey’s first exhibition was presented at the Studio Museum in Harlem, in 1979. Since then, his work has been presented internationally to critical and popular acclaim. Recent large-scale exhibitions of his photographs have been presented at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Art Institute of Chicago, and the Tate Modern, London. Bey’s writings on his own and others’ work are included in Dawoud Bey: Seeing Deeply and Dawoud Bey on Photographing People and Communities, and High Times, Hard Times: New York Painting 1967 – 1975. Learn more about Dawoud Bey.

About Carrie Mae Weems

Portrait of Carrie Mae Weems

Over her career, Carrie Mae Weems has created a complex body of artwork through which she explores power, class, black identity, womanhood, the historical past – and its resonance in the present moment. In addition to photography, Weems creates video, performance, and works of public art, and she organizes thematic gatherings which bring together creative thinkers across a broad array of disciplines. Her work has been exhibited across the world, at venues such as the Frist Center for the Visual Arts, the Solomon Guggenheim Museum, the Centro Andaluz de Arte Contemporáneo, Seville, Spain, and the American Academy in Rome, Italy. Learn more about Carrie Mae Weems.

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Past Exhibitions

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s​

On view September 30, 2021 through January 16, 2022

Etel Adnan (Lebanon). Oil on canvas. Collection of the Barjeel Art Foundation, Sharjah, UAE
Etel Adnan (Lebanon). Autumn in Yosemite Valley, 1963–1964.Oil on canvas, 20 1/8 x 20 1/8 in. Collection of the Barjeel Art Foundation, Sharjah, UAE

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s explores mid-20th-century abstract art from North Africa, West Asia, and the Arab diaspora—a vast geographic expanse that encompasses diverse cultural, ethnic, linguistic, and religious backgrounds. Comprising nearly 80 works by artists from countries including Algeria, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Morocco, Palestine, Qatar, Sudan, Syria, Tunisia, and the United Arab Emirates (UAE), the exhibition is drawn from the collection of the Barjeel Art Foundation based in Sharjah, UAE. Inspired by Arabia calligraphy, geometry and mathematics, Islamic decorative patterns, and spiritual practices, they expanded abstraction’s vocabulary—thus complicating its genealogies or origin and altering how we view non-objective art. The paintings, sculpture, drawings, and prints on view reflect the wide range of nonfigurative art practices that flourished in the Arab world over the course of four decades. At the Tampa Museum of Art, Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s is possible thanks to a community sponsorship by Morgan Stanley. The exhibition is also supported in part by Colonial Distributing and George & Debbie Baxter in honor of Dr. Mudhafar Amin and Zahar Hadid.​

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Past Exhibitions

Her World in Focus: Women Photographers from the Permanent Collection

On view through September 5, 2021

Maria Friberg (Swedish, b. 1966), "Almost There (#2)", 2000. Dye destruction print (Cibachrome) mounted on glass. 47 x 60 inches. Tampa Museum of Art. Gift of the artist and Conner Contemporary Art, 2010.002.
Maria Friberg (Swedish, b. 1966), Almost There (#2), 2000. Dye destruction print (Cibachrome) mounted on glass. 47 x 60 inches. Tampa Museum of Art. Gift of the artist and Conner Contemporary Art, 2010.002.

The Tampa Museum of Art’s holdings in photography represents the largest collecting areas of the permanent collection. The collection now comprises more than 950 photographs and illustrates a range of processing techniques and approaches to the medium. Her World in Focus: Women Photographers from the Permanent Collection highlights important women photographers in the Museum’s collection. From the candid street photography of Dianora Niccolini to Jan Groover’s influential still life photographs, and Cindy Sherman’s iconic portraiture, the exhibition highlights key genres of post-war photography. Personal identity and reflections on place appear in the works by artists such as Maria Martinez-Cañas. The exhibition will also include the work of Berenice Abbott, Barbara Ess, Maria Friberg, Penelope Umbrico, and others.

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Skyway 20/21: A Contemporary Collaboration

On view June 3 through October 10, 2021

Skyway 20/21 Installation View at the Tampa Museum of Art
Skyway 20/21: A Contemporary Collaboration installed at the Tampa Museum of Art. Photography by Paige Raburn.

Skyway 20/21: A Contemporary Collaboration celebrates the artists and work created in the Tampa Bay area. Launched as a triennial exhibition in 2017, this survey show is the second presentation of Skyway and is mounted collaboratively by the Tampa Museum of Art, Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg, the John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art, and the Contemporary Art Museum at the University of South Florida. Skyway highlights the breadth of artistic practices in the counties served by the organizing museums: Hillsborough, Pinellas, Manatee, Sarasota, and new to the exhibition, Pasco. The exhibition will be on view simultaneously at the four museums.

Exhibiting at the Tampa Museum of Art are Jaime Aelavanthara & Amanda Sieradzki, Kim Anderson, Wendy Babcox, Janet Folsom, Samson Huang, Cassia Kite, Jason Lazarus, Jenn Miller, Sarah O’Donoghue, Herion Park, Anat Pollack, Libbi Ponce, Selina Román, John Sims, Mike Solomon, Jill Taffet, and Kirk Ke Wang.

SKYWAY A Contemporary Collaboration 20/21
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Past Exhibitions

Elena del Rivero: Home Address

On view through April 29, 2021

Elena del Rivero (Spanish, b, 1949), "Letter from Home: Suffrage", 2020. Nylon. 7 ½ x 9 ¾ feet. Courtesy of the artist and Henrique Faria, New York. Photographer: Philip LaDeau. Elena del Rivero
Elena del Rivero (Spanish, b, 1949), Letter from Home: Suffrage, 2020. Nylon. 7 ½ x 9 ¾ feet. Courtesy of the artist and Henrique Faria, New York. Photographer: Philip LaDeau. © Elena del Rivero

Elena del Rivero: Home Address is a multi-venue project commemorating the 100th anniversary of the 19th amendment and women’s right to vote. In honor of this milestone, artist Elena del Rivero (Spanish, b. 1949) created 19 flags to be hoisted at 19 organizations across the United States in 2020 and 2021. The flags, reminiscent of everyday stained cloth towels, prompt references to the kitchen as both a domestic and political space for female empowerment. On view across the United States, the project Home Address aims to acknowledge the local histories that shaped the broader national fight for equal rights. The artist, in collaboration with the host institution, dedicates the flag to an important woman of color in each community where immediate access to voting may not have been possible after passage of the 19th amendment.  

About the Artist

Born in Valencia, Spain in 1949, Elena del Rivero is the recipient of major grants and prizes in recognition of her work. She recently received a grant from Anonymous Was a Woman (2020) and in 2019, was awarded a fellowship from the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation. Del Rivero’s work resides in the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; the Musuem of Modern of Art, New York; National Gallery of Art, Washington DC; and Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, Madrid, Spain. The artist lives and works in New York City. 

The presentation of Elena del Rivero: Home Address at the Tampa Museum of Art is sponsored by Todd Walker. 

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Past Exhibitions

An Art of Changes: Jasper Johns Prints, 1960-2018

On view April 29 through September 5, 2021

Jasper Johns "Target"
Jasper Johns (American, b. 1930),Target, 1974. Screenprint on paper. 35 1/8 x 27 3/8 inches. Ed. 3/70. Collection Walker Art Center, Gift of Judy and Kenneth Dayton, 1988 © Jasper Johns/VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY

Jasper Johns (American, b. 1930) made his first print, a lithograph of a target, in 1960. He immediately realized that printmaking was the perfect medium through which to explore his interest in change. Since 1960, he has reworked many of his paintings in print form, using strategies such as fragmentation, doubling, mirroring, and variations in scale or color. To date, he has created more than 350 prints in intaglio, lithography, wood- and linoleum cut, screen printing, lead relief, and blind embossing. Because of his commitment to graphic art, his dazzling virtuosity, and his technical inventiveness, he is widely regarded as one of the greatest printmakers of the 20th century. An Art of Changes surveys Johns’s career as a printmaker though a selection of some 100 prints from 1960 through 2018. It is organized in four thematic sections that follow Johns as he revises and recycles key motifs over time, including his signature imagery of flags, targets, and maps. 

An Art of Changes: Jasper Johns Prints, 1960–2018 is organized by the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis.

Supported in part by:

Judi M. Kelly

Culture Builds Florida
Tampa Museum of Art Foundation
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Past Exhibitions

Sketches and Sculptures: A Study of C. Paul Jennewein

On view through February 28, 2021

C. Paul Jennewein (German/American, 1890–1978), Coral, 1926. Silvered bronze. H. 32 inches. Tampa Museum of Art, Gift of Dr. and Mrs. Joel Klayman in honor of Max and Dorothy Diamond, 1999.014.

C. Paul Jennewein’s (German-American, 1890-1978) artwork reveals the inspiration of the ancient world while also engaging with the new sculptural styles of his time, merging Art Deco with the neo-classical tradition. In 1978, the Tampa Bay Art Center, predecessor of the Tampa Museum of Art, received a bequest of 2,600 objects including finished artworks, as well as preparatory drawings, plaster casts, and molds for the numerous commissions Jennewein received during his prolific career. Sketches and Sculptures: A Study of C. Paul Jennewein highlights this extensive archive. The exhibition presentsan overview of the artist’s early sculptures and four major commissions executed between 1925 and 1940 that defined Jennewein as one of the most significant sculptors of his day.

Sketches and Sculpture: A Study of C. Paul Jennewein is part of the Tampa Museum of Art’s centennial exhibition series Celebrating 100 Years.

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Past Exhibitions

Young @ Art 2021

On view January 16 through February 14, 2021
Lily Hund, "Toys of the Past-Louse Nevelson Installation Inspiration," Collage, Academy of the Holy Names, 8th Grade, Art Teacher: Galina Abele
Lily Hund, Toys of the Past-Louse Nevelson Installation Inspiration, Collage, Academy of the Holy Names, 8th Grade, Art Teacher: Galina Abele

Artwork from Hillsborough County public and private schools, grades K-8 

Each year the Tampa Museum of Art invites Hillsborough County art teachers to submit a student’s artwork for the Young at Art Student Exhibition. The Museum celebrates the creativity of this year’s submissions from students in kindergarten through eighth grade. We would also like to acknowledge the dedication and support of the visual arts by the educators, school staff and administration, the Hillsborough County School Board, the Hillsborough Education Foundation and the families and friends of the artists. 

Due to events related to Super Bowl LV, the exhibition is closed to the public January 29, January 30, January 31 and February 3, February 4, February 5, February 6, and February 7. 

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Past Exhibitions

Living Color: The Art of the Highwaymen

On View November 19, 2020 through March 28, 2021

Harold Newton (American, 1934-1991), "Untitled (Royal Poinciana)", n.d. Oil on Upson board. 23 ½ x 29 ¾ inches. Courtesy of the Asselstine Collection. © Harold Newton. Photography by Tariq Gibran.
Harold Newton (American, 1934-1991), Untitled (Royal Poinciana), n.d. Oil on Upson board. 23 ½ x 29 ¾ inches. Courtesy of the Asselstine Collection. © Harold Newton. Photography by Tariq Gibran.

The Highwaymen are a group of African American artists celebrated for their distinctive paintings of Florida’s natural environment. Working in and around the Fort Pierce area beginning in the 1950s, these self-taught artists depicted the state’s scenic coastline and wild backcountry, often in dazzling combinations of color and tone. Brilliant tropical sunsets, windblown palms, towering sunlit clouds, and blooming royal poinciana trees are among the many subjects that have become iconic images of Florida, in part because of the paintings that the Highwaymen created.

Living Color: The Art of the Highwaymen focuses on work produced from the 1950s to the 1980s by a core group of the Highwaymen including Al Black, Mary Ann Carroll, Willie Daniels, Johnny Daniels, James Gibson, Alfred Hair, Roy McLendon, Harold Newton, Sam Newton, Willie Reagan, and Livingston Roberts. The exhibition brings special attention on two key artists, Harold Newton and Alfred Hair, and presents extensive examples of their work. Drawn from five private collections, Living Color also considers the role of collectors in preserving the legacy of these artists and their extraordinary life stories.

The exhibition is organized by the Orlando Museum of Art and curated by Gary Monroe in collaboration with OMA curator Hansen Mulford.

Special thanks to:
The Asselstine Collection
The Jacobs Collection
The Lightle Collection
The Schlesinger Collection
The Walker Collection

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Past Exhibitions

The Making of a Museum: 100 Years, 100 Works

On view November 8, 2019 through March 15, 2020

Rockwell Kent (American, 1882-1971), "Skelpoonagh Bay, Donegal Ireland", 1926-27. Oil on Panel. 23 3/4 x  30 1/8 inches. Tampa Museum of Art, Gift of Dr. Mark Sheppard to the Tampa Bay Art Center, 1984.119. Rights courtesy of Plattsburgh State Art Museum, State University of New York, USA, Rockwell Kent Collection, Bequest of Sally Kent Gorton. All rights reserved.
Rockwell Kent (American, 1882-1971), Skelpoonagh Bay, Donegal Ireland, 1926-27. Oil on Panel. 23 3/4 x 30 1/8 inches. Tampa Museum of Art, Gift of Dr. Mark Sheppard to the Tampa Bay Art Center, 1984.119. Rights courtesy of Plattsburgh State Art Museum, State University of New York, USA, Rockwell Kent Collection, Bequest of Sally Kent Gorton. All rights reserved.

On the eve of the Tampa Museum of Art’s 100th anniversary in 2020, the exhibition The Making of a Museum: 100 Years, 100 Works from the Permanent Collection, features works representative of the institution’s collecting history and mission. The collection is unique—with significant holdings of ancient Greek and Roman art, as well as increased acquisitions of modern and contemporary art. With eight main categories, the collection features a breadth of objects: Classical Antiquities, Prints and Photographs Related to Classical Antiquity, the C. Paul Jennewein Archive, Painting, Decorative Arts and Sculpture, Photography, Works on Paper, and New Media, Video, and Installation Art.

The Making of a Museum: 100 Years, 100 Works will present unique insight into how the collection and identity of the Museum have evolved as it has grown from a small local arts organization to the City’s preeminent museum of art.

Sponsored in part by:  Celia and Jim Ferman

With additional support provided by: The Blanchard Family