The Space

The Tampa Museum of Art is located in downtown Tampa’s Curtis Hixon Waterfront Park. Its spectacular 66,000-square-foot Cornelia Corbett Center building was designed by San Francisco architect Stanley Saitowitz and has received many design awards.  The building features a shimmering pierced aluminum exterior, and state-of-the-art gallery spaces with innovative translucent ceilings and polished concrete floors. Seven expansive interior galleries, one exterior sculpture gallery, 12,000 sq. feet of LED coverage on the south facade, and educational classrooms equipped with the latest technology offers visitors a wide variety of visual art experiences.

The museum provides the region with world-class traveling exhibitions, a growing collection of contemporary and classical art, expanded educational programs and access to scenic outdoor events along Tampa’s Riverwalk. The museum is a nationally recognized major arts destination and premier venue for residents and visitors.

The Tampa Museum of Art’s Design Awards

Winner, Chicago Athenaeum 2011 American Architecture Jury Award

Winner, American Institute of Architecture, San Francisco Chapter, 2010 Honor Award

Winner, Southeast Construction 2010 Best Of Awards, Award of Excellence: Cultural

Winner, NAIOP Outstanding Special Use Building: Public Sector, 2010

 

About Architect Stanley Saitowitz

Stanley Saitowitz-portrait sStanley Saitowitz is Professor of Architecture at the University of California, Berkeley, and Principal of Natoma Architects Inc. in San Francisco. He was born in Johannesburg, South Africa, and received his Bachelor of Architecture Degree at the University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg in 1975, and his Masters in Architecture from the University of California, Berkeley in 1977. He began his practice in South Africa in 1975. Completed projects include the California Museum of Photography in Riverside, 1022 Natoma Street, a live/work building in San Francisco, residences at Stinson Beach, Los Gatos, Napa, Almaden, Oakland, Berkeley, Marin, San Francisco, Tiburon, and Davis, Nine Structures at Mill Race Park, Columbus Indiana, the New England Holocaust Memorial in Boston, the Capp Street Artist Workshop, the Quady Winery, the Auditorium at Wurster Hall, the San Francisco Embarcadero Promenade, the Coffee Pavilion at Stanford University, the Oxbow Art School in Napa, UCSF Mission Bay 23B Building, Lofts on Lafayette Street, Third Street, and at Yerba Buena in San Francisco. Current Projects include, The Visual Arts Library and Wurster Hall Forth Floor Link at the University of California, Berkeley, Beth El Synagogue in La Jolla, Beth Sholom Synagogue in San Francisco, First United Methodist Tower in San Jose, 1234 Howard Street, 1601 Larkin Street, 1029 Natoma Street, McArthur/San Pablo, and 555 Fulton Street.

Awards include The American Institute of Architects 1998 Henry Bacon Medal for Memorial Architecture, and the Boston Society of Architects1997 Harleston Parker Award, the 2003 AIA San Francisco Design Award, Best of the Bay, for Yerba Buena Lofts, the 2004 AIA San Francisco Design Award, Best of the Bay for the Lieff Residence, the 2005 AIA San Francisco Best of the Bay for Unbuilt Projects for Beth Sholom, the 2006 AIA San Francisco Best of the Bay for UCSF Mission Bay 23B Building, the Shaw Residence and Unbuilt Projects for First United Methodist Tower. The Transvaal House was declared a National Monument by the National Monuments Council of South Africa in 1997. The book, ‘Stanley Saitowitz – Architecture at Rice 33’ published by Rice University, Houston, and Princeton Architectural Press, New York, received a 1998 AIA International Architecture Book Award for Monographs.

He is a Professor of Architecture at the University of California, Berkeley, and has taught at a number of schools including the GSD, Harvard University (Eliot Noyes Professor 1991/2), University of Okalahoma (Bruce Goff Professor, 1993), Southern California Institute of Architecture, UCLA, the University of Texas, and the University of the Witwatersrand. He has lectured extensively in the USA, and abroad.