• Oswaldo Vigas: Transformations

    On view January 31 through May 27, 2019

    Oswaldo Vigas: Transformations presents the first American survey of artist Oswaldo Vigas (Venezuelan, 1923-2014). Organized by the Grand Rapids Art Museum, the exhibition examines Vigas’ influential career and his contributions to 20th-century modernism. A prolific artist, Vigas found inspiration in both the natural landscape of his native Venezuela and the European avant-garde. Oswaldo Vigas: Transformations focuses on works created between 1940 and 1980, and demonstrates the evolution of Vigas’ distinct artistic style. In the late 1940s, Vigas focused on figurative abstraction and created his vibrant series of Bruja (or witch) paintings. Cubism and constructivism influenced Vigas and by the 1950s, he shifted away from figuration and moved towards geometric abstraction. The works on view illustrate the scope of Vigas’ projects, from studio painter to muralist, and highlight the importance of his creative achievements.

    Born in 1923 in Valencia, Venezuela, Vigas studied medicine at Universidad de los Andes (ULA) in Mérida, Venezuela. In the 1950s, he gave up his medical practice to focus on his artwork. Vigas spent the next decade working and exhibiting his work in Paris, France. Vigas is celebrated as one of Latin America’s preeminent 20th-century painters, alongside artists such as Roberto Burle Marx, Wifredo Lam, and Rufino Tamayo. Vigas’ work has been featured in exhibitions around the globe and resides in prominent private and museum collections including the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; and the Art Museum of the Americas. Vigas passed away in 2014 in Caracas, Venezuela.

    Proyecto para mural en verde (Project for Mural in Green), 1953

    Oswaldo Vigas (Venezuelan, 1923-2014). Oil on paper glued on Masonite. 42 ½ x 29 ½ inches. Courtesy of the Oswaldo Vigas Foundation.

    Asmodé, 1970

    Oswaldo Vigas (Venezuelan, 1923-2014). Oil on canvas. 39 3/8 x 21 ½ inches. Courtesy of the Oswaldo Vigas Foundation.

  • Ancient and Modern Glass from the Collection

    On view March 23 through August 18, 2019

    As the Tampa Museum of Art nears its 100th anniversary, exhibitions in 2019 and 2020 will focus on the breadth of the institution’s permanent collection, as well as examine its collecting history. The Tampa Museum of Art’s holdings are unique, with distinct collections of Greek and Roman antiquities, as well as modern and contemporary art.

    Ancient Glass: A Closer Look in the Maureen and Doug Cohn Promenade.
    Drawn primarily from the permanent collection, this small exhibition includes examples of ancient Greek and Roman glass vessels made in a range of ancient techniques, including core-formed, blown, and mold-blown, some with trailed or mold-made decoration. A fine gold necklace with blue glass beads is also included, as well as several Greek and Egyptian objects made of faience, an ancient material with both ceramic- and glass-like properties.

    Shards and Illusions: Contemporary Glass from the Permanent Collection in the Wallace Family Promenade.
    Shards and Illusions: Contemporary Glass from the Collection features an intimate selection of contemporary glass by American and European artists John Kuhn, John Luebtow, Steve Maslach, Michael Pavlik, Louis Sclafani, Lino Tagliapietra, and Toots Zynsky. This presentation focuses on architectural, abstract forms and highlights the Tampa Museum of Art’s unique holdings in contemporary glass. Shards and Illusions offers an opportunity to view rarely exhibited works from the permanent collection.

    One-Handled Bottle

    Eastern Mediterranean, 3rd century AD. Glass (mold-blown body, separately made handle); H. 4 ¼ inches (10.8 cm). Tampa Museum of Art, Joseph Veach Noble Collection, 1986.157

    Rainbow Bloom, 1992

    Jon Kuhn (American, b. 1949). Glass. 9 3/4 inches. cube. Tampa Museum of Art, Gift of Jan Gordon, Ken Dickson, Michael Dickson, Robert Dickson, Harvey Gortner, and Terri Kenefsky in memory of Will and Bettie Gortner, 2001.036.

    Gate to Blue Illusion, 1995.

    Michael Pavlik (Czechoslovakian, b. 1941). Cut, polished, and laminated glass. 12 ½ x 16 x 12 inches. Tampa Museum of Art Gift of Dr. Richard and Barbara Basch, 2004.045.002.

    Night Street Chaos from the series Chaos, 1988

    Toots Zynsky (American, b. 1951). Fused and thermo-formed glass threads. 7 1/8 x 13 inches. Tampa Museum of Art, Gift of Dale and Doug Anderson, 1999.003.

  • Abstract Expressionism: A Social Revolution

    On view April 11 through August 11, 2019

    Abstract Expressionism: A Social Revolution presents twenty-five works from the Preston H. Haskell Collection indicative of Abstract Expressionism as a unifying direction in Post-World War II art. The exhibition highlights artists associated with the influential first and second generations of Abstract Expressionist painters including Willem de Kooning, Hans Hofmann, Helen Frankenthaler, Franz Kline, Morris Louis, Joan Mitchell, Robert Motherwell, Kenneth Noland, Mark Rothko, and Theodoros Stamos. Later works by Gerhard Richter, Jack Goldstein, Robert Rauschenberg, and Frank Stella respond or reflect on the lasting legacy of Abstract Expressionism in both the US and abroad. Viewed together, the works in Abstract Expressionism: A Social Revolution address how individual artistic expression and independence from institutional values altered the course of painting. In this exhibition, visual vocabulary will be discussed in relationship to the artists’ collective objectives and individual intentions.

    In addition to those mentioned above, artists represented in Abstract Expressionism: A Social Revolution include Josef Albers, Richard Anuszkiewicz, Karel Appel, Sam Francis, Michael Goldberg, Paul Jenkins, Jean Miotte, Judy Pfaff, Jean-Paul Riopelle, James Rosenquist, and Jack Tworkov. Unless noted otherwise, all works from the Collection of Preston H. Haskell.

    Aires Pour Marion, 1975-76

    Joan Mitchell (American, 1925-1992). Oil on canvas. Two panels, overall 94 1/4 x 141 1/2 inches. Collection of Preston H. Haskell. © Estate of Joan Mitchell

    Untitled, 1960

    Franz Kline (American, 1910-1962). Oil on paper. 18 1/2 x 17 3/4 inches. Collection of Preston H. Haskell. © 2018 The Franz Kline Estate / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

    Bond, 1960

    Jack Tworkov (American, b. Poland, 1900-1982). Oil on canvas, 61 x 36 inches. The Haskell Collection. © Estate of Jack Tworkov / Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY

  • Echoing Forms: American Abstraction from the Permanent Collection

    On view April 13 through August 18, 2019

    As the Tampa Museum of Art nears its 100th anniversary, exhibitions in 2019 and 2020 will focus on the breadth of the institution’s permanent collection, as well as examine its collecting history. The Tampa Museum of Art’s holdings are unique, with distinct collections of Greek and Roman antiquities, as well as modern and contemporary art.

    Echoing Forms: American Abstraction from the Permanent Collection presents paintings, works on paper, and photography by major artists associated with post-war American abstraction. Abstract Expressionism emerged as the dominant genre of painting in the mid-1940s. For the next 40 years, artists working across media would examine and redefine the boundaries of abstraction. From Robert Motherwell’s serial compositions of repeating ovoid and geometric forms, to the patterned brushwork of Alma Thomas, and Aaron Siskind’s photographic studies of found objects echoing gestural paint strokes, the Tampa Museum of Art’s collection includes work from influential artists associated with the rise of American abstraction.

    Artists featured in Echoing Forms also include Joseph Albers, Helen Frankenthaler, Adolph Gottlieb, Ellsworth Kelly, Elaine de Kooning, Kenneth Noland, Frank Stella, and others. Echoing Forms: Abstraction from the Permanent Collection is a companion show to the special exhibition Abstract Expression: A Social Revolution.

    Elegy Study I, 1989

    Robert Motherwell (American, 1915-1991). Lithograph in black and white on brown paper. 32 1/2 x 54 1/2 inches. Tampa Museum of Art, Gift of the Sybiel B. Berkman Foundation, 2000.104.

    Martha's Vineyard 2, 1952

    Aaron Siskind (American, 1903-1991). Gelatin silver print. 5 3/8 x 8 ¼ inches. Tampa Museum of Art, Museum purchase, 1990.007.

  • Tableau and Transformation: Photography from the Permanent Collection

    On view June 20 through October 6, 2019

    As the Tampa Museum of Art nears its 100th anniversary, exhibitions in 2019 and 2020 will focus on the breadth of the institution’s permanent collection, as well as examine its collecting history. The Tampa Museum of Art’s holdings are unique, with distinct collections of Greek and Roman antiquities, as well as modern and contemporary art.

    Tableau and Transformation: Photography from the Permanent Collection explores the Tampa Museum of Art’s holdings of 20th-century photography. The exhibition highlights explorations in photography through darkroom effects, distinct studio practices, and unique compositions in the work of photographers such as Zeke Berman, Chuck Close, and Lucas Samaras. Artists such as James Casebere, Robert Cumming, and Stephen Frailey create constructed environments, often blurring the boundaries of truth and fiction in their images. Several artists in Tableau and Transformation, including Eileen Cowin, Victor Burgin, and Cindy Sherman, reference art history as a means to explore identity, gender, and visual culture.

    Tableau and Transformation: Photography from the Permanent Collection features work by John Baldessari, Zeke Berman, Victor Burgin, James Casebere, Chuck Close, Eileen Cowin, Robert Cumming, Stephen Frailey, Duane Michals, Lucas Samaras, Cindy Sherman, William Wegman, and others. Select loans from local collections will also be featured in Tableau and Transformation.

    Untitled (The Bathers), 1987

    Eileen Cowin (American, b. 1947). Dye Destruction/Cibachrome. 41 x 49 inches. Tampa Museum of Art, Bequest of Edward W. Lowman by Exchange from the Jayne Baum Gallery, Inc., 1989.022.