Tampa Museum of Art

THE CLASSICAL WORLD: SELECTIONS FROM THE PERMANENT COLLECTION

 

Standed Krater, Attributed to the Hamilton Gray Painter, Italic, Late Geometic, ca. 710 BC
Standed Krater, Attributed to the Hamilton Gray Painter, Italic, Late Geometic, ca. 710 BC
Standed Krater, Attributed to the Hamilton Gray Painter, Italic, Late Geometic, ca. 710 BC
Black-Figure Eye Cup Greek, Attic (Chalcidizing), ca. 530–520 BC Ceramic
Black-Figure Eye Cup Greek, Attic (Chalcidizing), ca. 530–520 BC Ceramic

Tampa Museum of Art, Joseph Veach Noble Collection, purchased in part with funds donated by Craig   and Mary Wood  1986.051

Black-Figure Eye Cup  Greek, Attic (Chalcidizing), ca. 530–520 BC  Ceramic
Janiform Kantharos (Drinking Cup) Greek, Attic, ca. 470 BC Ceramic
Janiform Kantharos (Drinking Cup) Greek, Attic, ca. 470 BC Ceramic

Tampa Museum of Art, Joseph Veach Noble Collection  1986.091

Janiform Kantharos (Drinking Cup)  Greek, Attic, ca. 470 BC  Ceramic
Grave Altar of L. Caltilius Diadumenus Roman, ca. AD 140–170 Marble
Grave Altar of L. Caltilius Diadumenus Roman, ca. AD 140–170 Marble

Tampa Museum of Art, Purchased with funds provided by The Collectors  1991.001

Grave Altar of L. Caltilius Diadumenus  Roman, ca. AD 140–170  Marble

The Classical World

Ongoing

Multiple faces from the distant past greet visitors to The Classical World: a Roman freedman staring out from a marble grave altar carved in the second century AD; a pair of satyrs on Greek drinking cups from the sixth and fifth centuries BC; and a brightly painted terracotta maiden created to adorn the roofline of an Etruscan building in the fifth century BC. Together, these faces speak to the extraordinary scope of classical antiquity, spanning many centuries across broad geographical areas, and including numerous ancient cultures whose many contributions to western civilization can hardly be overstated—from the alphabet and democracy to countless masterworks of literature and the visual arts.

For more than 30 years, the Tampa Museum of Art has collected artwork from across classical antiquity, which this exhibition explores from its prehistoric beginnings to its late Roman decline (i.e., from the third millennium BC into the fourth and fifth centuries AD). With important loans from local private collectors augmenting the permanent collection, The Classical World includes nearly 300 artworks produced in ancient

Greece and Italy as well as North Africa and the Near East. Following the diverse faces first welcoming visitors, the exhibition is arranged across two galleries according to chronology, medium, and culture. Particularly noteworthy is the Museum’s collection of black-figure and red-figure pottery, produced mainly in Greece and South Italy during the sixth, fifth, and fourth centuries BC. Also included are important works of sculpture in terracotta, stone, and precious metal, as well as ancient coins, jewelry, and glass vessels. The exhibition concludes with a life-sized painted Egyptian anthropoid sarcophagus.