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Antiquities Circle Lecture

when


  • Tuesday
  • November 5, 2019
  • 6:30 pm - 8:00 pm

location


description


Ancient Entanglements: Lessons in Cultural Diversity

 

Ancient societies, from the dawn of history to the fall of the Western Roman Empire, were culturally entangled in many significant ways. From forms of writing to long-distance trade, via migration and intermarriage, to art and religion, ancient cultures were interconnected with and drew inspiration from each other. In this lecture Dr. Branko van Oppen will discuss the importance of understanding ancient cultural diversity for the present-day.

Dr. Branko van Oppen is an ancient historian specialized in queenship during the period from Alexander the Great to Cleopatra. He received his PhD from CUNY [or: The City University of New York], where he studied with Sarah Pomeroy; he has over a decade of wide-ranging teaching experience in the U.S. and his native country The Netherlands; and he has worked for five years at the Allard Pierson Museum, which holds the archaeological collection of the University of Amsterdam. Dr. van Oppen’s academic interests further include clay seal impressions, animals in ancient material culture, and Romano-Egyptian mummy portraits, as well as art history and ancient religion.

The Antiquities Circle presents lectures throughout the year that celebrate the Museum’s collection of Ancient Greek and Roman antiquities. We draw in scholars from around the country to discuss their expertise or share new discoveries in ancient art.

Join Antiquities Circle

  • Art+ Members:Free
  • Students (with valid ID):Free
  • Not-Yet Members:Free with regular Museum admission

Join us for a brief reception with light bites and drinks available for purchase at 6:30p. Lecture begins at 7p.

Register Now

Museum Members may RSVP to Education@TampaMuseum.org

Questions? Contact us at Education@TampaMuseum.org or 813.421.6631

Image: Sphageion (Funerary Vessel), South Italian, Canosan, 3rd century BC. Ceramic; H. 70 cm. Tampa Museum of Art, Gift of William Suddaby, 2002.016.a–.f.