• Tableau and Transformation: Photography
    from the Permanent Collection

    On view June 20 through October 20, 2019

    Tableau and Transformation presents an overview of the Tampa Museum of Art’s holdings in 20th-century photography, a cornerstone of the Museum’s permanent collection. The exhibition looks at how artists have used distinct darkroom effects and studio practices to create new narratives in photography.  Artists such as James Casebere, Robert Cumming, Stephen Frailey, Sandy Skoglund, and William Wegman create constructed environments, often blurring the boundaries of truth and fiction in their images. Photographers Blythe Bohnen, Duane Michals, Arnulf Rainer, Lucas Samaras, Cindy Sherman examine the transformation of one’s self as a means to explore identity, gender, and place.

    This exhibition features approximately 50 photographs with objects ranging in date from the mid-1960s to through the early 2000s. Predominately drawn from the Museum’s permanent collection, Tableau and Transformation includes artists John Baldessari, Morton Bartlett, Zeke Berman, Blythe Bohnen, Victor Burgin, James Casebere, Eileen Cowin, Robert Cumming, Robert Fichter, Stephen Frailey, Les Krims, Duane Michals, Patrick Nagatani and Andreé Tracey, Arnulf Rainer, Richard Ross, Lucas Samaras, Andres Serrano, Cindy Sherman, Sandy Skoglund, Joel Sternfeld, and William Wegman. Tableau and Transformation also features key loans from Trenam Law’s photography collection and includes companion photographs by several of the above-mentioned artists, as well as Laurie Simmons and Doug and Mike Starn.

    As the Tampa Museum of Art nears its 100th anniversary, exhibitions in 2019 and 2020 focus on the breadth of the institution’s permanent collection, as well as examine its collecting history. The Tampa Museum of Art’s holdings are unique, with collections of Greek and Roman antiquities, as well as modern and contemporary art.

    Germs are Everywhere, 1984

    Sandy Skoglund (American, b. 1946), Dye Destruction / Cibachrome. 37 x 44 ½ inches. Tampa Museum of Art, Bequest of Edward W. Lowman by Exchange, 1989.021. © 1984 Sandy Skoglund

    Waterfall, 1983

    James Casebere (American, b. 1953), Gelatin silver print. 24 x 30 inches. Edition of 5. Tampa Museum of Art, Bequest of Edward W. Lowman by Exchange, 1989.043. © James Casebere

    Untitled (The Bathers), 1987

    Eileen Cowin (American, b. 1947), Dye Destruction/Cibachrome. 41 x 49 inches. Tampa Museum of Art, Bequest of Edward W. Lowman by Exchange from the Jayne Baum Gallery, Inc., 1989.022. © 1987 Eileen Cowin

    Sponsored in part by

  • Abstract Expressionism: A Social Revolution
    Selections from the Haskell Collection

    On view April 11 through August 11, 2019

    Abstract Expressionism: A Social Revolution, Selections from the Haskell Collection, presents twenty-five works from the Haskell Collection indicative of Abstract Expressionism as a unifying direction in Post-World War II art. The exhibition highlights artists associated with the influential first and second generations of Abstract Expressionist painters including Willem de Kooning, Hans Hofmann, Helen Frankenthaler, Franz Kline, Morris Louis, Joan Mitchell, Robert Motherwell, Kenneth Noland, Mark Rothko, and Theodoros Stamos. Later works by Gerhard Richter, Jack Goldstein, Robert Rauschenberg, and Frank Stella respond or reflect on the lasting legacy of Abstract Expressionism in both the US and abroad. Viewed together, the works in Abstract Expressionism: A Social Revolution address how individual artistic expression and independence from institutional values altered the course of painting. In this exhibition, visual vocabulary will be discussed in relationship to the artists’ collective objectives and individual intentions.

    In addition to those mentioned above, artists represented in Abstract Expressionism: A Social Revolution include Josef Albers, Richard Anuszkiewicz, Karel Appel, Sam Francis, Michael Goldberg, Paul Jenkins, Jean Miotte, Judy Pfaff, Jean-Paul Riopelle, James Rosenquist, and Jack Tworkov. Unless noted otherwise, all works from the Haskell Collection.

    Presenting Sponsors: Maureen and Doug Cohn

    Catalogue Sponsors: Dr. and Mrs. Robert G. Isbell

    Aires pour Marion, 1975-76

    Joan Mitchell (American, 1925-1992), Oil on canvas. Two panels, overall 94 1/4 x 141 1/2 inches. The Haskell Collection. © Estate of Joan Mitchell

    The Keep, 1958

    Michael Goldberg (American, 1924–2007), Oil on canvas. 58 x 48 ½ inches. The Haskell Collection, © The Estate of Michael Goldberg, Courtesy Michael Rosenfeld Gallery, LLC, New York, NY

    February’s Turn, 1979

    Helen Frankenthaler (American, 1928-2011), Acrylic on canvas. 48 1/8 x 108 1/4 inches. The Haskell Collection. © 2019 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

    Untitled, 1968

    Mark Rothko (American, b. Russia, 1903–1970), Oil on paper mounted on canvas. 39 3/8 x 25 inches. Collection of Preston H. Haskell. © 2018 Kate Rothko Prizel & Christopher Rothko / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

    Untitled, 1960

    Franz Kline (American, 1910-1962), Oil on paper. 18 1/2 x 17 3/4 inches. The Haskell Collection. © 2018 The Franz Kline Estate / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

    Bond, 1960

    Jack Tworkov (American, b. Poland, 1900-1982), Oil on canvas, 61 x 36 inches. The Haskell Collection. © Estate of Jack Tworkov / Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY

  • Echoing Forms: American Abstraction from the Permanent Collection

    Farish Gallery, on view through July 28, 2019
    Saunders Gallery, on view through August 18, 2019

    As the Tampa Museum of Art nears its 100th anniversary, exhibitions in 2019 and 2020 will focus on the breadth of the institution’s permanent collection, as well as examine its collecting history. The Tampa Museum of Art’s holdings are unique, with distinct collections of Greek and Roman antiquities, as well as modern and contemporary art.

    Echoing Forms: American Abstraction from the Permanent Collection presents paintings, works on paper, and photography by major artists associated with post-war American abstraction. Abstract Expressionism emerged as the dominant genre of painting in the mid-1940s. For the next 40 years, artists working across media would examine and redefine the boundaries of abstraction. From Robert Motherwell’s serial compositions of repeating ovoid and geometric forms, to the patterned brushwork of Alma Thomas, and Aaron Siskind’s photographic studies of found objects echoing gestural paint strokes, the Tampa Museum of Art’s collection includes work from influential artists associated with the rise of American abstraction.

    Artists featured in Echoing Forms also include Joseph Albers, Helen Frankenthaler, Adolph Gottlieb, Ellsworth Kelly, Elaine de Kooning, Kenneth Noland, Frank Stella, and others. Echoing Forms: Abstraction from the Permanent Collection is a companion show to the special exhibition Abstract Expression: A Social Revolution.

    Elegy Study I, 1989

    Robert Motherwell (American, 1915-1991), Lithograph in black and white on brown paper. 32 1/2 x 54 1/2 inches. Tampa Museum of Art, Gift of the Sybiel B. Berkman Foundation, 2000.104. Robert Motherwell © 2019 Dedalus Foundation, Inc. / Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY. Saunders Gallery.

    Martha's Vineyard 2, 1952

    Aaron Siskind (American, 1903-1991), Gelatin silver print. 5 3/8 x 8 ¼ inches. Tampa Museum of Art, Museum purchase, 1990.007. Saunders Gallery.

  • Ancient and Modern Glass from the Permanent Collection

    Shards and Illusions on view through August 18, 2019
    Ancient Glass: A Closer Look on view April 11 through August 18, 2019

    As the Tampa Museum of Art nears its 100th anniversary, exhibitions in 2019 and 2020 will focus on the breadth of the institution’s permanent collection, as well as examine its collecting history. The Tampa Museum of Art’s holdings are unique, with distinct collections of Greek and Roman antiquities, as well as modern and contemporary art.

    Shards and Illusions: Contemporary Glass from the Permanent Collection in the Wallace Family Promenade.
    Shards and Illusions features an intimate selection of contemporary glass by American and European artists Jon Kuhn, John Luebtow, Steven Maslach, Michael Pavlik, Louis Sclafani, Lino Tagliapietra, and Toots Zynsky. This presentation focuses on architectural, abstract forms and highlights the Tampa Museum of Art’s unique holdings in contemporary glass. Shards and Illusions offers an opportunity to view rarely exhibited works from the permanent collection.

    Ancient Glass: A Closer Look in the Maureen and Doug Cohn Promenade.
    Drawn primarily from the permanent collection, this small exhibition spotlights examples of ancient Greek and Roman glass vessels made in a range of ancient techniques, including core-formed, blown, and mold-blown, some with trailed or mold-made decoration. The objects on view help to illustrate the development of glass production in the classical world over a period of nearly one thousand years.

    One-Handled Bottle

    Eastern Mediterranean, 3rd century. Glass (mold-blown body, separately made handle); H. 4 ¼ inches (10.8 cm). Tampa Museum of Art, Joseph Veach Noble Collection, 1986.157

    Rainbow Bloom, 1992

    Jon Kuhn (American, b. 1949), Glass. 9 3/4 inches. cube. Tampa Museum of Art, Gift of Jan Gordon, Ken Dickson, Michael Dickson, Robert Dickson, Harvey Gortner, and Terri Kenefsky in memory of Will and Bettie Gortner, 2001.036.

    Oinochoe (Jug)

    Greek, 4th century BC. Glass (core-formed); H. 3 ¾ inches (9.5 cm). Tampa Museum of Art, Joseph Veach Noble Collection, 1986.153.

    Night Street Chaos from the series Chaos, 1988

    Toots Zynsky (American, b. 1951), Fused and thermo-formed glass threads. 7 1/8 x 13 inches. Tampa Museum of Art, Gift of Dale and Doug Anderson, 1999.003.

  • The Classical World in Focus: Contests, Combat, and Commemoration

    Ongoing, installed July 14, 2018

    Contests, combat, and commemoration played important and often interrelated roles in ancient art, life, and culture. This small exhibition, drawn primarily from the Museum’s permanent collection, explores a number of these connections within both mythological and historical contexts. Altogether, some eighty works of Greek, Roman, Etruscan, and Egyptian art are included, ranging from the sixth century BC to the fourth century AD, and from painted pottery to sculpture in terracotta, bronze, and stone. Ongoing, installed July 14, 2018.

    Black-Figure Neck Amphora (Storage Vessel) with Athena Facing a Warrior

    Attributed to the Swing Painter, Greek, Attic, ca. 540-530 BC. Ceramic. Tampa Museum of Art, Joseph Veach Noble Collection, 1986.025

    Grave Altar of L. Caltilius Diadumenus

    Roman, AD 140–170. Marble. Tampa Museum of Art, Purchased with funds provided by The Collectors, 1991.001

    Sponsored in part by the State of Florida, Department of State, Division of Cultural Affairs and the Florida Council on Arts and Culture

  • The Classical World

    Ongoing, reinstalled July 14, 2018

    The Classical World showcases nearly 200 Greek, Etruscan, and Roman artworks and artifacts from the Museum’s notable antiquities collection, supplemented with important loans from local private collectors. Ranging from prehistoric pottery and sculpture (dating from as early as 3000 BC) to marble sculpture and terracotta from the Roman Empire (dating to as late as the 5th century AD), the exhibition includes a particularly fine assortment of Greek and South Italian black-figure and red-figure vases. Also included in the exhibition are important works of sculpture in terracotta, stone, and precious metal, as well as ancient coins, jewelry, and glass vessels. Ongoing, reinstalled July 14, 2018.

    Lion Couchant

    Greek, Archaic, ca. 6th century BC. Limestone; L. 17 inches (44 cm).

    Statue of Poseidon/Neptune alongside Dolphin

    Roman, 1st century AD (Flavian [AD 69–96]?). Marble; H. 62.2 inches (158 cm). Tampa Museum of Art, Joseph Veach Noble Collection, 1986.135.

    Sponsored in part by the State of Florida, Department of State, Division of Cultural Affairs and the Florida Council on Arts and Culture

  • Aphrodite Reimagined by Patricia Cronin

    With her commissioned outdoor sculpture Aphrodite Reimagined, 2018, Patricia Cronin (American, b. 1963) has re-envisioned a fragmentary Aphrodite torso in the Museum’s antiquities collection as a monumental “complete” statue of the goddess. With a stone torso and translucent head and limbs, the sculpture acts as a metaphor for shifting historical certainties.

  • Kiss and Tell by Wolfgang Flad

    Wolfgang Flad is a German artist living and working in Berlin. Born in 1974, he studied textile design at Fachhochschule Reutlingen and fine arts at the Akademie der Bildenden Künste, Stuttgart. He has had numerous solo exhibitions in Germany and other European countries, and has placed his artwork in museum collections in Germany, Switzerland, and the Netherlands. Primarily a sculptor, Flad is interested in “upcycling” previously used material, and in creating unexpected associations and connections between art and the natural world.

    Kiss and Tell consists of some 30 individual wooden elements hanging from a grid in the Morsani Atrium. Each element has been coated with different types of paint and varnish, as well as with papier-mâché made from various papers dealing with art (critical texts, invitations, magazines, books, catalogs, etc). In this way Flad tries to bring the material back into organic shapes and structures reminiscent of the trees and other plants from which such materials first originate. According to Flad, this idea is close to that of the Italian artist, Giuseppe Penone, who has talked about “the hidden life within” in his peeled wood works that reveal delicate plants inside larger beams. Flad is also interested in the flora and fauna of Florida, where he spends time each year; some of his forms resemble mangroves and other plants from this region.

    Generous funding for the framework used to hang this artwork provided by the Raymond James Gasparilla Festival of the Arts.

  • Laura with Bun by Jaume Plensa

    Jaume Plensa is an internationally acclaimed artist who has exhibited his sculptures in museums all over the world.  In locations as diverse as Seoul, Paris, Chicago, Bordeaux and London, Plensa’s monumental sculptures have reaffirmed the power of art to transform a public space into a community. This is aptly demonstrated in his first major commission in the United States, The Crown Fountain in Chicago’s Millennium Park (2004). Two 11-story LED towers face each other across a thin pool of water, with images of a changing and diverse city reflected in the water, a continuously cycling metaphor for the life of a city.

    The Crown Fountain was the beginning of Plensa’s investigation of the portrait via photography and form. This led to works like Laura with Bun. At more than 23 feet tall, this artwork expresses both individual and universal traits at great scale, inviting viewers to consider multiple aspects of beauty and human nature. Like all of his large-scale female portrait heads, Laura has her eyes closed, as if looking within. In speaking about these works, Plensa has said, “Look into yourself. My piece is a mirror to reflect your image, so you can think about your own interior—how much beauty we have inside of ourselves.”

    Laura with Bun initially came to Tampa as part of the 2016 exhibition Jaume Plensa: Human Landscape. Thanks to the generosity of an anonymous gift and the overwhelming popular support of nearly 100 donors, the Museum has committed to purchase the sculpture for our permanent collection.

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